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Moving into a new house can be exciting — and overwhelming at the same time. Unless you’re starting from scratch, you likely have a few existing pieces of furniture that you’re taking to your new place. But how do you know what to keep and what to let go? Follow our expert tips to make the moving process a breeze:

1. Save what you love

This one is a no brainer — is your current sofa something you already invested in and is in great shape? Does your grandmother’s vintage writing desk have a special place in your heart? No need to ditch the things you love just because you’re moving to a new house. We truly believe that if you love a piece, you can work around it!

2. Ditch what’s falling apart

Still holding onto that IKEA cube shelf that you bought off of Craigslist in college? Maybe it’s time to let that one go. We’re firm believers that your furniture should work for you, not against you, so anything that isn’t holding it’s weight (literally), it’s time to donate! Textiles like curtains, rugs, and bedding can show wear and tear if you’ve had them for a while, so it’s never a bad idea to give these a refresh when moving to a new place.

3. Recognize versatile pieces

Consoles and cabinets can make great pieces for pretty much any room in your house (ditto for bookshelves!), so if you have a good piece that doesn’t quite fit where you’d expect it to, keep it just in case it’ll work in another space in your new home. Is that side table in good shape, but maybe not the right color for your new digs? A fresh coat of paint or a new finish can give a piece a whole new life.

Feeling inspired? Start your own Havenly design project today by taking our free style quiz.quiz_button

4. Consult the experts

Did you know our Havenly designers love working around existing pieces? If you have something great to work with, that frees up more budget for new goodies! Chat with one of our designers for free to day to get some expert advice on which pieces are keepers and which ones might be better for your local Goodwill.

Words by Kylee Trunck